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New Custom Hearing Aids

New Custom Hearing Aids

New Custom Hearing Aids available at the Henley Hearing Clinic.

New Custom Hearing Aids are truly the new way to have extraordinary connectivity, clarity of hearing and discreet hidden in the ear canal.  GN Resound one of the worlds leading hearing aids manufactures have been able to create a unique small hearing aid with the power to connect and make hearing the norm.  Please read bellow for more info on the new GN in the ear custom hearing aid.

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The Henley hearing clinic is the premier private hearing clinic in Buckinghamshire.  Leon Cox a specialist hearing expert and will conduct hearing tests in the comfortable surroundings of the centrally located premises.  As well as hearing aids, hearing tests, Henley Hearing Clinic also specialise in ear wax removal using Micro-Suction or the traditional water irrigation technique (ear syringing).

 

Henley Hearing Clinic News:

 

Great Sound in Miniature: GN Hearing Introduces New Custom-crafted Hearing Aids

Logo
Aug. 30, 2019 11:00 UTC

BALLERUP, Denmark–(BUSINESS WIRE)– GN Hearing, the global leader in hearing aid connectivity, today launched a suite of new custom-crafted hearing aids. The new portfolio packages the industry renowned ReSound LiNX Quattro™ technology – a brilliant experience with Layers of Sound, great speech intelligibility even in noisy situations, and excellent streaming – into discreet custom-crafted hearing aids. While taking up as little space as possible in the ear canal, users will benefit from an impressive listening experience.

Great hearing is in high demand. Not only are 466 million people around the world living with disabling hearing lossi, ReSound LiNX Quattro has also seen a positive reception in the market, which has led to the launch of new custom hearing aids for this popular model. The new custom-crafted hearing aids can enrich people’s lives with all the qualities of hearing, such as socializing, learning, and working optimally. In addition, each hearing aid is designed to fit exactly to the ear canal of every individual user, using a 3D scanner and advanced personalized modelling. Sitting discreetly in the ear canal, the design can also bring extra confidence to the user.

ReSound LiNX Quattro is a clear number one for streaming. In an independent study, streaming music and speech from an iPhone was top-rated for ReSound LiNX Quattro compared to other hearing aidsii. Users can benefit from using the new small and discreet custom-crafted hearing aids for taking calls and streaming their favorite music and TV shows. They can also stream sound directly to the hearing aids from an iPhone with no need for intermediate devices and the hearing aids are built for direct Android™ streaming, tooiii.

“ReSound LiNX Quattro has been very well received by people with hearing loss. We are dedicated to bringing the technological benefits to more users, who prefer wearing their hearing aids discreetly in the ear canal,” said Jakob Gudbrand, President and CEO of GN Hearing. “These technological wonders in miniature are truly personalized and custom-crafted to fit each person’s hearing, yet with the brilliant experience with Layers of Sound and excellent streaming that people appreciate.”

Four new options are available: the first Completely-in-Canal (CIC) 2.4 GHz wireless hearing aid for direct streaming, high-quality In-the-Canal (ITC) and In-the-Ear (ITE) models, and the industry’s only Mic-in-Helix (MIH) hearing aid. Each custom-crafted hearing aid comes in five skin-tone colors to ensure that they are personal and discreet for every user.

Browse the ReSound customs portfolio.

The new custom-crafted hearing aids are now also available in the Beltone AmazeTM collection.

 

 

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Hearing aids for Buckinghamshire

Hearing aids for Buckinghamshire

 

Hearing aids for Buckinghamshire at the Henley Hearing Clinic.  We pride ourselves on being at the vanguard of hearing technology here at the Henley Hearing Clinic. Leon Cox the lead audiologist is a first class audiologist who keeps up today with the new tech that comes out constantly.  Today we are looking at the recently announced Phonak Marvel. For those who don’t know what this product is here is a sample from their Press release.

”In October 2018, Phonak introduced Marvel, a hearing aid family that’s said to “combine all the top-requested features from hearing aid wearers” into one solution.

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According to Phonak, this technology also helps to improves accessibility to hearing care by empowering consumers to benefit from a suite of smart apps that connect hearing aid wearers with their hearing care professional via smartphone. These include video chat, instant feedback regarding their wearing experience, remote fine-tuning from anywhere in the world, and real-time, voice-to-text transcription of phone calls”.

Sounds good?  We think so and we are pleased that Phonak has won a prestigious award saying that they agree too. If this Phonak product sounds like something you may like more info on then please let us know and we could arrange an appointment to see if this would be right for you.

See the rest of the info on the Phonak Marvelproduct bellow.

 

Henley Hearing Clinic News: 

Phonak Marvel Wins Silver Edison Award for Hearing Aid Design Technology

Phonak Marvel hearing aid technology also improves accessibility to hearing care by empowering consumers to benefit from a suite of smart apps that instantly connect hearing aid wearers with their hearing care professional via their smartphone.

Phonak Marvel available at the Henley Hearing Clinic Bucks

Phonak Marvel, said to be “the world’s first hearing aid” to combine clear sound quality with universal “made for all” Bluetooth connectivity, received a Silver Award in the hearing aid design technology category at the Edison Awards gala in New York City, the hearing aid manufacturer announced. The Edison Awards, named after Thomas Alva Edison, recognizes and honors innovators and innovations.

In October 2018, Phonak introduced Marvel, a hearing aid family that’s said to “combine all the top-requested features from hearing aid wearers” into one solution.

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According to Phonak, this technology also helps to improves accessibility to hearing care by empowering consumers to benefit from a suite of smart apps that connect hearing aid wearers with their hearing care professional via smartphone. These include video chat, instant feedback regarding their wearing experience, remote fine-tuning from anywhere in the world, and real-time, voice-to-text transcription of phone calls.

All nominations were reviewed by the Edison Awards Steering Committee and the final ballot sent to an independent judging panel. The judging panel was comprised of more than 3,000 professionals from the fields of product development, design, engineering, science, marketing, and education, including professional organizations representing a wide variety of industries and disciplines.

Hearing aids for Buckinghamshire

For more information on the 2019 Edison Awards, please visit: www.edisonawards.com.  Applications for the 2020 awards will open in August 2019.

 Source: Phonak, Edison Awards

Images: Phonak

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Starkey hearing aids, Henley hearing Clinic

Starkey hearing aids, Henley hearing Clinic

 

We sell and dispense all types of hearing aids at the Henley Hearing Clinic. One of the big guns is Starkey. Recently they announced a new innovation for their Live Ai hearing aids. It now comes with fall detection, meaning it will detect if you have a fall and if you are paired with your phone it will message up to 3 contacts  that you have specified before hand.

Read the full press statement bellow for more info, or if you are interested in knowing more please pop in or make an appointment so we can walk you through the new hearing aid and it’s features.

 

Henley Hearing Clinic News:

Starkey Releases World’s First Hearing Aid with Fall Detection and Alerts to Livio AI Users

balance problems increase risk for fallsStarkey Hearing Technologies, Eden Prairie, Minn, has released its new Fall Detection and Alert feature in Livio AI hearing aids to a limited number of hearing professionals, and plans to offer the feature to all dispensing professionals and their clients in late February, according to CTO Achin Bhowmik, PhD, in an interview with Hearing Review on Tuesday, December 18. Using integrated sensors, the Fall Detection and Alert feature is designed to automatically detect falls and send messages to as many as three contacts.

Fall detection sensors are currently implemented in all Livio AI devices as part of its standard hardware platform, and Starkey has been working on the Fall Alert feature to maximize its utility for end users prior to the system’s widespread implementation.

Falls are a massive public health problem, particularly for older adults. It’s estimated that injuries due to falls will account for $67.7 billion in public health spending by 2020, and according to the National Council on the Aging (NCOA) falls are currently responsible for an older adult being admitted to a US emergency room every 11 seconds. Additionally, people with hearing loss are particularly susceptible to falls. A Johns Hopkins study suggests that having hearing loss triples the risk of falls for people age 40 and older—and the findings hold up regardless of whether their hearing loss is moderate or severe.

StarkeyFallsInfoGraphic

How Starkey Fall Detection and Alerts work. Starkey’s new Fall Detection system is said to have several benefits over existing stand-alone medical alert systems, which are typically attached to a lanyard around the neck. “The first key advantage is that a hearing aid is almost always in your ear during your active hours, making for one less thing to carry or remember. One of the major problems with medical alert systems is getting people to wear them,” says Bhowmik. “Second, we have two fall detection sensors [in binaural fittings] for the right side and the left side, whereas most fall detection systems have only one. And the way the two sensors are spaced apart and the way in which you hold your head, we can get better and more accurate results than neck-worn sensors designed to detect falls.”

Starkey CTO Achin Bhowmik spoke about the possibility of fall detection and other sensor-based capabilities at the 2018 Starkey Expo held in January.

Starkey CTO Achin Bhowmik spoke about the possibility of fall detection and other sensor-based capabilities at the 2018 Starkey Expo held in January.

According to Bhowmik, part of Starkey’s recent research has revolved around what constitutes an actual fall as opposed false-positives such as quick downward movements or even accidentally dropping the hearing aid. “If you take the hearing aid off your ear and drop it on the ground, you will not get a false-positive for falling with Livio AI,” says Bhowmik. “We have been working on [eliminating false-positives] for over a year. A good AI system is only as good as the data you train the system with. In this particular case, if the left hearing aid detects a fall, it immediately checks with the right hearing aid to see if the data matches what would indicate a fall for the system. Unless it detects a fall from the hearing aids in tandem for both the right and left sides of the head, the device will eliminate those non-fall events and false-positives.”

Starkey Livio AI hearing aid

Starkey Livio AI hearing aid.

The hearing care professional will be able to activate Fall Detection and Alerts through an easy-to-use interface within the fitting software for Starkey’s Livio AI hearing aids. The user can then enter the Auto Alert contacts—up to three people who are to be alerted in the event of a fall within the Thrive Hearing App. When a fall is detected by the system, an audio prompt asks the user if they have fallen. He or she then has 60 seconds to provide an Event Cancellation and stop the outgoing Fall Alert messages from being sent to their designated contacts. If the hearing aid user has fallen and elects to send the Fall Alert message to his/her contacts, they receive confirmation when each contact has been successfully reached.

The system also allows for a Manual Alert which can be activated by simply pressing the hearing aid button, sending an alert for a fall or non-fall related event. “Maybe you didn’t fall, but instead just felt dizzy or were otherwise forced to sit down on the floor,” explains Bhowmik. “Obviously, this is not a fall. But you can still use the Manual Alert to get help when you need it. By tapping a button, you can send an automatic alert to your contacts, telling them you need assistance.”

This is just another step in the direction of making the hearing aid a multi-purpose, multi-functional device, according to Starkey.

To learn more about Starkey’s Livio AI you can visit: https://www.starkey.com/hearing-aids/technologies/livio-artificial-intelligence-hearing-aids

 

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New Hearing Devices in Development May Expand Range of Human Hearing

New Hearing Devices in Development May Expand Range of Human Hearing

Henley hearing Clinic specialise in the latest Digital hearing aids and specialise in earwax removal.

http://www.dreamstime.com/stock-photography-hearing-aids-image16750072

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are developing atomically thin ‘drumheads’ able to receive and transmit signals across a radio frequency range far greater than what we can hear with the human ear, the University announced in a press release.

But the drumhead is tens of trillions times (10 followed by 13 zeros) smaller in volume and 100,000 times thinner than the human eardrum.

It’s been said that the advances will likely contribute to making the next generation of ultralow-power communications and sensory devices smaller and with greater detection and tuning ranges.

“Sensing and communication are key to a connected world,” said Philip Feng, an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science and corresponding author on a paper about the work published March 30 in the journal Science Advances. “In recent decades, we have been connected with highly miniaturized devices and systems, and we have been pursuing ever-shrinking sizes for those devices.”

The challenge with miniaturization: Also achieving a broader dynamic range of detection, for small signals, such as sound, vibration, and radio waves.

“In the end, we need transducers that can handle signals without losing or compromising information at both the ‘signal ceiling’ (the highest level of an undistorted signal) and the ‘noise floor’ (the lowest detectable level),” Feng said.

While this work was not geared toward specific devices currently on the market, researchers said, it was focused on measurements, limits, and scaling which would be important for essentially all transducers.

Those transducers may be developed over the next decade, but for now, Feng and his team have already demonstrated the capability of their key components—the atomic layer drumheads or resonators—at the smallest scale yet.

The work represents the highest reported dynamic range for vibrating transducers of their type. To date, that range had only been attained by much larger transducers operating at much lower frequencies—like the human eardrum, for example.

“What we’ve done here is to show that some ultimately miniaturized, atomically thin electromechanical drumhead resonators can offer remarkably broad dynamic range, up to ~110dB, at radio frequencies (RF) up to over 120MHz,” Feng said. “These dynamic ranges at RF are comparable to the broad dynamic range of human hearing capability in the audio bands.”

New dynamic standard

Feng said the key to all sensory systems, from naturally occurring sensory functions in animals to sophisticated devices in engineering, is that desired dynamic range.

Dynamic range is the ratio between the signal ceiling over the noise floor and is usually measured in decibels (dB).

Human eardrums normally have dynamic range of about 60 to 100dB in the range of 10Hz to 10kHz, and our hearing quickly decreases outside this frequency range. Other animals, such as the common house cat or beluga whale, can have comparable or even wider dynamic ranges in higher frequency bands.

The vibrating nanoscale drumheads developed by Feng and his team are made of atomic layers of semiconductor crystals (single-, bi-, tri-, and four-layer MoS2 flakes, with thickness of 0.7, 1.4, 2.1, and 2.8 nanometers), with diameters only about 1 micron.

They construct them by exfoliating individual atomic layers from the bulk semiconductor crystal and using a combination of nanofabrication and micromanipulation techniques to suspend the atomic layers over microcavities predefined on a silicon wafer, and then making electrical contacts to the devices.

Further, these atomically thin RF resonators being tested at Case Western Reserve show excellent frequency ‘tunability,’ meaning their tones can be manipulated by stretching the drumhead membranes using electrostatic forces, similar to the sound tuning in much larger musical instruments in an orchestra, Feng said.

The study also reveals that these incredibly small drumheads only need picoWatt (pW, 10^-12 Watt) up to nanoWatt (nW, 10^-9 Watt) level of RF power to sustain their high frequency oscillations.

“Not only having surprisingly large dynamic range with such tiny volume and mass, they are also energy-efficient and very ‘quiet’ devices,” Feng said. “We ‘listen’ to them very carefully and ‘talk’ to them very gently.”

The paper’s co-authors were: Jaesung Lee, a Case Western Reserve post-doctoral research associate; Max Zenghui Wang, a former research associate now at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC), Chengdu, China; Keliang He, a former graduate student in physics, now a senior engineer at Nvidia; Rui Yang, a former graduate student and now a post-doctoral scholar at Stanford University; and Jie Shan, a former physics professor at Case Western Reserve now at Cornell University.

The work has been financially supported by the National Academy of Engineering Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Award (Grant: FOE 2013-005) and the National Science Foundation CAREER Award (Grant: ECCS-1454570).

Original Paper: Lee J, Wang Z, He K, Yang R, Shan J, Feng PX-L. Electrically tunable single- and few-layer MoS2nanoelectromechanical systems with broad dynamic rangeScience Advances. 2018;4(3):eaao6653.

Source: Case Western Reserve University, Science Advances

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Which hearing aids are best for me?

Which hearing aids are best for me?

Henley Hearing Clinic

You’ve been diagnosed with hearing loss and the hearing healthcare professional says you’ll benefit from wearing hearing aids, but which devices are best for you? The decision you make will depend greatly on the severity of your hearing loss as well as your health and the lifestyle you lead. Before you sit down to discuss options with your hearing healthcare provider, here are a few things to consider.

Are you a technology buff?

best hearing aids for me
Your hearing aids should be as individual
as you are!

Hearing aids have changed a lot in the last ten years. Today’s devices are nothing like those your parents or grandparents may have worn, mainly because of advances in technology. While your parents’ hearing aids had to be adjusted with a tiny screwdriver by a hearing care provider, today’s digital devices are programmed via computer. Gone are the days of fiddling around with bulky volume control wheels and buttons. Most of today’s devices can be controlled discreetly by the wearer with smartphone apps as listening environments change. Bluetooth technology allows hearing aids to connect wirelessly to that smartphone you bought the moment it became available, tablets, televisions or car audio.

How much of a techie are you? Chances are, there’s a hearing aid that can keep up with your fascination for cutting edge gadgets. If you’re not a technology lover, don’t despair – the technology in your new hearing aids can also work behind the scenes automatically so you can just focus on hearing your best.

Is your world noisy?

Let’s face it — life can be loud! Depending upon what you do for a living and how often you’re socially engaged with people you love spending time with, directional microphone technology can help you make sense of that noise. Dual microphones in the hearing aid work to help you understand speech in challenging listening environments such as noisy conventions, crowded restaurants and bars or a family room filled with chattering children by focusing on the sound directly in front of you and minimizing sound to the sides and back.

Nearly all hearing aids today have some form of noise reduction built in. This technology is best for increasing your comfort in noisy situations, but it’s the directional microphones that have a noticeable impact on your ability to understand conversation in these same situations. Be honest about your lifestyle and talk with your hearing care provider about which features you need.

Are you self-conscious about your hearing loss?

Let’s be clear: there’s absolutely nothing wrong with wearing hearing aids — no matter whether they’re visible to others standing close to you or fit snugly out of sight inside your ear canal. These miracle devices not only help you hear your favorite sounds, they also alert you to emergency warning signals and decrease your risk of falling, developing dementia and feeling depressed. What’s not to love?

Unfortunately, some prefer to be more discreet about their hearing loss. For those individuals, tiny receiver-in-the-canal (RIC) or receiver-in-the-ear (RITE) styles with ultra-thin tubing and an availability of colors which blend with skin or hair may be desirable. For even more invisibility, invisible-in-the-canal (IIC) or completely-in-the-canal (CIC) styles may be an option.

The discretion of small hearing aids can come with some tradeoffs. Your hearing healthcare professional can help you decide, given the severity of your hearing loss and your personal preferences, which style is best for you.

Do you have dexterity issues?

Diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and other health conditions can cause numbness in the fingers or a decline in fine motor skills. The smaller the hearing aid, the smaller the features — such as the battery door or volume control. If you struggle with putting on jewelry or activities which require fine motor skills, you will likely benefit from wearing hearing aids that fit behind-the-ear (BTE) or a larger custom style. It’s much better to own devices you can operate confidently and effectively than one which frustrates you so much it spends more time in your nightstand than in your ear.

Summary

It’s important to remember that no two people or their hearing losses are alike, but there are hearing aids to suit most every need. The best hearing aids are the ones that work for you. Instead of waiting to make a decision because you’re afraid you’ll make the wrong one, find a hearing healthcare professional to guide you. Working as a team, the two of you can determine which devices will work for your unique hearing situation.

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Hearing Aid Review - ReSound LiNX 9 (BTE/CRT)

ReSound LiNX 9/7 Digital Hearing Aid reviewed by Leon Cox (Mr Hender, Rickmansworth)

ReSound LiNX 9 ZoomImagine a new kind of hearing aid that makes hearing effortless.  A hearing aid that lets you hear more of everything. And everything you hear is vivid, natural. Imagine speech that’s clear, strong and easy to understand. No matter where you are. What you’re doing. Or who you’re listening to.  Imagine a video call with a loved one on your iPhone. Listening to the music that moves you on your iPod touch. Or watching a favorite film on your iPad. All through wireless headphones that just happen to be your hearing aids.

ReSound LiNX is the first iPhone and iPad compatible hearing aid. Syncronisation of the iPhone to the hearing aids provides a platform to control features such as volume, on/off, program selection, device connectivity and lost aid finder.  For instant adjustment the aid has a dual volume and program switch for hearing aid users used to operating settings from the aid. The LiNX comes in a range of colours and is extremely discreet in size

and stylish in appearance; it is comparible to similar hearing aids in its class from Widex, Phonak, Oticon and Starkey however its connectivity capabilies and amplification range makes it a formidable challanger for best in range as it can fit comfortably 90%+ of all hearing loss configurations. Studies carried out by an independent lab- oratory have shown that the sound quality that is provided by Surround Sound by ReSound is con- sistently top-rated compared to other manufacturers’ most advanced hearing instruments. The hearing aid has 4 optional manual programs which can be accessed using the iPhone.

Streaming of music, calls, apps, audiobooks, movies and navigation can all be transmitted to the hearing aids wirelessly making your hearing aids the centre of your digital world. ReSound was the first manufacturer to build the international standard for wireless communication – 2.4 GHz – directly into hearing aids. The benefits of 2.4 GHz are many:

  • No additional hardware to wear around your neck stream sound directly because all the technology you need is in your hearing aids
  • Longer distance – stream sound from 7 meters away or more, not just 30-50 cm like other hearing aid brands
  • Robust connection – enjoy crystal clear sound with no fallouts or delays
  • Ease-of-use – all accessories are simple to set up, pair and use Private connection – no one can listen in

At Chalfont Hearing Centre, Amersham, Buckinghamshire we are dedicated to ensuring that our audiologist Leon Cox gives you the best information possible. So we work with our existing patients, who volunteer to road test the latest hearing aids for you; to ensure they are good enough for us to dispense. The following report was kindly contributed by Mr Hender:

“In comparison to my existing Siemens hearing aid I found the sound level to be far greater and was aware of a ‘digital edge’ to the sound. At first I found the connection to the iPhone a challange and that the bluetooth link provided a slight drain in the battery on my iPhone. Playing music through the hearing aids was brilliant, and was impressed that when using the iPhone to navigate to my friends house it gave me instructions through the hearing aids.  The Music sounded slightly tinny at first then I found the bass and treble settings which made the sound very pleasent. After wearing the hearing aids for a while I became more used to the sound and found them useful in a party environment, access to the volume control also can in handy. Over the course of the trial I have found that the Resound hearing aids were subjectively better than my previous Siemens hearing aids. The improvement is not sufficient for me to rush to upgrade right now however I have only had my existing hearing aids for 2 years; if I had my existing aids longer I probably would change, so it may be something I will consider in 12 months time. Thank you very much for making the test possible it has been really useful”

One person’s account does not necesarily provide all the information you need to make a decision about purchasing a hearing aid and everyones experience is different. So if you would like to try the ReSound LiNX 9 or 7 hearing aids then contact Chalfont hearing on 01494 765144 for a no obligation trial.