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Hearing issues, Henley

Hearing issues, Henley

 

Hearing loss in Bucks

 

The Henley Hearing Clinic is a private hearing company based in Henley, Buckinghamshire. Leon Cox, the lead audiologist can help with all matters relating to hearing issues & ear wax removal, also the latest hearing instruments (Hearing aids) and conducts hearing tests.  Book ahead for a comprehensive hearing test and discussion on your hearing heath after the hearing test result.

If you are suffering with hearing loss and suspect that ear wax maybe the issue, Leon Cox will conduct either Micro-suction or use the traditional water ear irrigation technique. Microsuction is painless and is the latest way to remove stubborn ear wax from your ear canal.

earwax removal, ear-wax removal, hearing aids, Microsuction,

Hearing tests, hearing aids, ear wax removal in Henley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

HEARING issue

News originaly taken from the Hearing Review

Hearing Technology Manufacturers Call for EU Response to Hearing Loss

 

The British and Irish Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (BIHIMA) works closely with its European counterpart the European Hearing Instrument Manufacturers Association (EHIMA), and has supported their recent efforts to raise awareness of hearing loss with EU policymakers, the trade association announced. EHIMA submitted a parliamentary question to the European Commission in July, which has recently received a response from ministers.

 

The question, which was signed by the Austrian MEP Heinz K. Becker, can be read in full here. The question points to a widening gap between people that self-report hearing loss and the smaller proportion that receive treatment and/or wear devices; this “suboptimal use” of devices is estimated to cost the EU over EUR 500 billion (about USD $583.73 billion) annually. Citing the European Pillar of Social Rights—principles 16 and 17 which cover health care and the inclusion of people with disabilities—the question asks how the Commission can support best practices like early screenings, community education about the benefits of hearing devices, and research related to prevention and treatment strategies for hearing loss.

HEARING issues

The European Commission published its answer on August 24, pointing to its efforts to develop the Best Practice Portal, a website described as a “one-stop shop” for best practices in a number of public health initiatives related to the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals developed by the United Nations. In particular, the website aims to meet goal 3.4, “to reduce premature mortality from non-communicable diseases through prevention and treatment and promote mental health and well-being, by one-third.” Additionally, the Commission’s 7th Framework Program for Research (FP7) as well as Horizon 2020—an EU research and innovation program—have funded research on the auditory system, screening standards, hearing devices, diagnosis and treatment of hearing loss-related diseases, and sign language. Further, the Commission states they have proposed a EUR 7.7 billion (USD about $9 billion) health budget for Horizon Europe 2020, focusing on initiatives related to lifelong health, rare diseases, and health care technologies, among other things. To further facilitate hearing-related funding, the Commission said, “Horizon Europe will be open to research proposals on hearing loss, including prevention and rehabilitation and innovative treatments.”

According to BIHIMA’s announcement, the Commission’s response is considered a positive exchange of information. Further, they state, BIHIMA’s European hearing manufacturing partners are encouraged that a greater understanding of hearing loss is being fostered among European policymakers.

“BIHIMA stand fully behind our European partners, EHIMA, in their effort to draw much-needed attention to hearing loss and we applaud this initiative to influence EU decision-making,” said Chairman Paul Surridge.

BIHIMA and EHIMA are together committed to the work of improving the lives of people with hearing loss through promoting greater access to hearing technology.

Source: BIHIMA, EHIMA, European Commission

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What should I be able to hear?

hearing loss range1The Range of human hearing refers to the spectrum of pitch range and loudness levels a person hears between inaudible and the feeling of discomfort.

Loudness and pitch

The human hearing range depends on both the pitch of the sound – whether it is high or low – and the loudness of the sound. Pitch is measured in Hertz (Hz) and loudness is measured in decibels (dB).

A person with normal hearing, will have be able to hear pitches which start as low as about 20 Hz (e.g.  the same tone as the lowest pedal on a pipe organ), and extends to about 20,000Hz. While 20 to 20,000Hz forms the the extreme borders of the human hearing range at our peak, our hearing is most acute in the 2000 – 5000 Hz frequency range.

As far as loudness is concerned, humans can hear most frequencies at starting at 0 dB to around 11db. Sounds that are more than 85dB can be painful and ultimately dangerous to listen to for prolonged periods.

Examples of typical sounds:

Hearing loss2

Effectively and astonishingly, there are some sounds that humans can’t hear. For instance the sound of a dog whistle, which is extremely high pitch. Low frequency sounds are often felt as vibrations rather than heard as sound.

Hearing ranges of people with hearing loss

When you acquire hearing loss, it affects the range of your hearing. Most people will experience a loss of sensitivity which is often particularly more prominent in the higher pitch range. Certain speech sounds, and instruments like flutes will be more difficult to hear with hearing loss.

In order to gauge your actual hearing range a hearing aid audiologist will need to perform a hearing test and plot your thresholds on to an audiogram. An audiogram is a chart that shows the results of your hearing test. Your hearing test results are plotted on a graph and then compared with that of a person with normal levels of hearing. Hearing professionals use the audiogram to establish your hearing loss and as a tool for fitting hearing aids.

Here’s what an audiogram looks like:

Hearing loss3

This test shows your hearing “threshold” or the point where you can’t hear any more. This thresholds are recorded for both ears separately as two separate lines on your audiogram.The red line shows the level of hearing of a person’s right ear. The left ear is plotted with a blue line.

The area below the line shows the levels of hearing loss that this person can hear and the area above the line shows the levels that the person can’t hear.

Here are some common sounds plotted on a standard audiogram:

hearing loss4

What are your Next Steps

If you feel that your hearing range isn’t what it used to be, It’s a good idea to visit a hearing centre like ours for a full hearing test. We can determine whether or not you have hearing loss or whether you have wax problems or even more serious medical issues. We can then recommend a course of action if you do have a hearing loss.

Visit our Centres in Henley-on-thames or Chalfont, Amersham to get a hearing test today.

 

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